That’s One Unruly Cock

Two months have passed since I posted the video of our rooster’s first cute attempts at crowing. During those two months, we have had our share of listening to him crow and we no longer think it is cute or funny or anything like that. In fact, very little about him is endearing in any way at all.

Ever aware of our movements and actions, this beady-eyed little demon may have his days numbered.

Ever aware of our movements and actions, this beady-eyed little demon may have his days numbered.

Last month while the hydro company was clearing the branches with a power saw near the hydro wires on our street, Roo crowed incessantly for nine hours, three days in a row. He crowed even after his crow cracked and he began to lose his voice. He crowed so much that he would drop off into an exhausted sleep in between crowing sessions.

Soon after that, we discovered that he crows in response to the whirr of power tools. If you use the power drill once, he will crow about 7 times in response. If he hears the chainsaw, the circular saw, the tractor or any other machinery, he crows. Unfortunately, these are the sounds of the Queendom (and our entire neighbourhood) – especially on weekends. We now gladly don our hearing protection whenever we undertake a project!

If we thought that the crowing was a bother, then we were in for a surprise when the attacks began. A few weekends ago, FM had the planer out and spent a couple of hours preparing boards for the next great project. Roo, of course, crowed in response to the noise and came closer and closer to watch. Soon enough, Roo was hurling himself, claws first, at FM over and over. His head would lower in a downward dog position, his wings would drop to the ground and his white cape would flare out just before he would launch. FM deflected the attacks with the planed board but had to keep one eye on Roo for the rest of the day.

This initial series of attacks has now become a regular occurrence. Roo has decided that FM is a constant threat and moves to attack him often when FM goes near the shop door. One morning, while retrieving his bike to begin his commute to work, FM found Roo stalking him and once again had to deflect the attack with the bicycle. Although I am not yet on Roo’s enemy list, he has attacked me twice, but both were related to food distribution so I discount them.

I have done some reading about rooster behaviour. One theory says that there is an alpha-rooster in every flock and regular battles occur in order to establish the alpha. Roo’s behaviour shows that he sees FM as a rival and is initiating pecking order battles with him. Advice points to keeping Roo lower on the scale through a few behaviour modifications to establish the alpha:

  • don’t let Roo mate with the hens in your presence, since a lower rooster would not have this privilege in a flock. We now have a water spray bottle at hand whenever we are outside with them
  • respond to his attacks with assertiveness. FM now chases Roo all over the yard when he shows aggression
  • isolate him from his hens. We have done this once or twice in the new chicken run but that means that the hens don’t have access to their nesting boxes and we don’t want them to choose new places to lay

FM is chasing Roo around to let him know who is the Queendom’s alpha cock on the block

In order to get any projects done, we have taken to locking Roo up in the chicken run with the hens but that doesn’t prevent the sound of crowing from boring into our heads and making us crave a little stewed chicken for dinner. ‘Cock on the Chopping Block’ may be the title of a future instalment.

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7 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    Oh, my! He sounds a bit aggressive. We don’t have a rooster yet, and honestly, I’m almost scared to get one after the stories I’ve heard. He is beautiful though!

  2. 3

    You guys are giving him every chance! but some creatures simply cannot change their ways (sadly true of some people, too!!). We sent our two roosters to “auction” when they were just old enough to start pecking their sisters. The hens will hassle each other every once in awhile, but not with the viciousness and persistence of roosters, at least in my observation. Good luck trying to get the message through!

    • 4

      Along A Path said,

      Thanks Christi. I remember reading about your Tux and Dusty as they entered rooster-hood and I have considered following your route of auctioning him off. It’s that or the stew-pot!

  3. 5

    Sandy said,

    A very funny post, Martha. And useful, too, in understanding the backyard chicken.
    Also, is that a cleaver in the first photo?

    • 6

      Along A Path said,

      Funnily enough, none of this has been very amusing to us! The learning curve is steep and not always pleasant. And no, that is not a cleaver but it could serve a similar purpose!


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